How Poland’s Holocaust memory influenced the new law – a lecture by Dr. Jolanta Ambrosewicz-Jacobs, from the Jagiellonian University in Krakow

Students of the Weiss-Livnat MA Program in Holocaust studies were recently treated to an engaging and poignant lecture by Dr. Jolanta Ambrosewicz-Jacobs; Memory, Non-Memory, and Post-Memory of the Holocaust in Poland.

IMG_5965.jpg

Dr. Jolanta Ambrosewicz-Jacobs at the University of Haifa

Dr. Ambrosewicz-Jacobs is a lecturer at the UNESCO Chair for Education for the Holocaust, and former Director of the Centre for Holocaust Studies at the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland. She holds a Ph.D. in Humanities and Habilitation in Cultural Studies from Jagiellonian University and has been a Pew Fellow at the Center for the Study of Human Rights at Columbia University and a DAAD fellow at the memorial and educational site at the Wannsee Conference House.

With the recently enacted “Amended Act on the Institute of National Remembrance” causing waves in both academic and political spheres, Dr. Ambrosewicz-Jacobs’ lecture provided students the opportunity to learn first-hand about the internal politics behind the new law and how it is perceived by Polish Holocaust scholars. Although the Amended Act refers to accusations against Poland as a country, not against individuals, and provides room for artistic and academic statements, critics worry that it could make it a crime to discuss anti-Semitic acts committed by Polish individuals.

Dr. Ambrosewicz-Jacobs’ lecture emphasized the historical complexity leading to the Act’s creation and the intricate collective WWll memory of the Polish people. She opened her talk by citing William James Booth’s concept of Communities of Memory which views collective identity as having been created by a common recollection of history; the commonality in Poland being self-identification as victims. Communities of memory tend to be insular and not empathetic to the victims of other communities. From Dr. Ambrosewicz-Jacobs’ perspective, the inability of the Polish population to empathize with the Jewish victims of the Holocaust is a major factor influencing political policies today. Dr. Ambrosewicz- Jacobs identified specific historical contexts which shaped Polish Collective Holocaust Memory and help explain this lack of empathy.

Continue reading

Advertisements

New research on the belated commemoration of Raoul Wallenberg in Sweden and Hungary

IMG_5277

Dr. Nadav Kaplan presents at the University of Haifa

Students of the Weiss-Livnat International MA in Holocaust Studies recently had the honor of attending a lecture by Dr. Nadav Kaplan. Born in Israel in 1945, Dr. Kaplan served as a combat pilot and was a commander and senior executive in the Israeli air force for 35 years. He holds a B.A in Economics and Business Administration from Bar-Ilan University and an MSC in Management from MIT University. In 2017 he earned his Ph.D. at Haifa University.

Dr. Kaplan’s lecture related to his Ph.D. dissertation topic – the belated commemoration of Raoul Wallenberg in Sweden and Hungary between 1945-2014.

People around the world are familiar with the hero Raoul Wallenberg, who was recruited by the United States War Refugee Board to serve as a diplomat to Sweden’s embassy in Budapest, Hungary in the final years of WWII. He is credited with saving thousands of Hungarian Jews from deportation to death camps by issuing them “protective passports” which identified the holders as Swedish citizens awaiting repatriation.

Continue reading

University of Haifa President, Professor Ron Robin, gives Keynote Address at Conference of the Association of Israel Studies

220px-ROYH6622

University of Haifa President, Professor Ron Robin

Monday, June 25th, 2018 – University of Haifa President, Professor Ron Robin, gave the keynote address at the 34th Annual Conference of the Association of Israel Studies (AIS). Held for the first time at the University of California, Berkeley (where Pres. Robin received his Ph.D.), the conference brought together humanities and social science scholars, as well as Ph.D. candidates from around the world whose research focuses on the modern state of Israel.

President Robin’s keynote speech addressed the major points of friction surrounding free speech within the University sphere, particularly as reflected on Israeli campuses. President Robin argued that Universities are institutions of education, not sovereign states, and, as such, are responsible for ensuring that free speech on campuses reflects a pedagogical mission.

Continue reading

Newsletter – Spring 2018

Screenshot_2...

Website  ■  Blog  ■  Donate  ■  Scholarships


Newsletter – Spring 2018


The Spring semester is always a special time at the Weiss-Livnat International Program. We begin to see the fruits of our current student’s hard work and dedication and are excited by their success. But it is also a bittersweet time as we begin to bid our current cohort goodbye and prepare for the new cohort’s arrival in October. Please enjoy this newsletter sharing accounts from the past semester, upcoming events and introductions to some of our new students.

Thank-you for following the Weiss-Livnat International MA Program at the University of Haifa. Your continued support and interest is vital to our program’s success.

Arieh J. Kochavi & Yael Granot-Bein

Continue reading

Museums and Shoah – The Case of Italy: Guest Lecture from Professor Paolo Coen, Università degli Studi di Teramo

download.jpgStudents participating in the course Visual Culture in the Holocaust were honored to hear a fascinating lecture from Professor Paolo Coen on the state of Holocaust memorialization in Italy. In addition to his position at the University in Teramo, Professor Coen also sits on the board of the planned Museo della Shoah in Rome. The museum will be the first of its kind in Italy and is projected to open in 2021.

Continue reading

Emerging Holocaust Scholars Conference hosted at University of Haifa

The University of Haifa was honored to host the conference; Torch Bearers: Emerging Scholars in the Feild of Holocaust Studies on May 7-8, 2018. The conference brought together a collection of international Ph.D. fellows and MA graduate students from around the world, currently pursuing Holocaust research in an Israeli academic institution.

IMG_5110.JPG

University of Haifa Professor Dr. Kobi Kabalek, University of Haifa Ph.D. Fellow Lukas Meissel, Head of the Weiss-Livnat MA Program Dr. Arieh J. Kochavi

The two-day conference was moderated by leading Israeli Holocaust scholars, including; Dr. Dan Michman from Bar-Ilan University and Yad Vashem, Dr. Chavi Dreyfus from Tel Aviv University and Yad Vashem, Dr. David Silberklang from Weiss-Livnat MA Program at the University of Haifa and Yad Vashem, Dr. Kobi Kabalek from the Weiss-Livnat MA Program at the University of Haifa, Dr. Dinah Port from Tel Aviv University and Yad Vashem, Dr. Roni Stauber from Tel Aviv University, and Dr. Chana Yoblonka from Ben Gurion University and The Ghetto Fighters House.

Continue reading

Alumna Madene Shacher Publishes Chapter in New EVZ Foundation Book

image_previewMadene Shacher, an alumna of the Weiss-Livnat International MA Program in Holocaust Studies, Cohort II, has co-authored a chapter published in a new book from the EVZ Foundation. (EVZ, an acronym from German, is translated as; Foundation Remembrance, Responsibility, and Future)The new book; Interactions. Explorations of Good Practice in Educational Work with Videotaped Testimonies of Victims of National Socialism, explores the challenges,  considerations, and opportunities educational professionals face when utilizing video testimonies in their lesson plans.

Madene Shacher’s chapter is titled; Educational Programmes Based on Child Survivor Video Testimonies at Yad Layeled Children’s Memorial Museum/Ghetto Fighters’ House Israel. In the chapter, Madene and her co-author, Dr. Michal Saden, explore the uses of video testimonies of Holocaust child survivors in permanent and rotating exhibitions at the Yad LaYeled Memorial Museum and present the museum staff’s re-evaluations and ongoing reflections regarding the use of videotaped testimonies for young learners. Additionally, an assessment based method for choosing the most appropriate videos is discussed.

Continue reading