Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust

Call for Articles!

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Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust invite the submission of original articles in all areas of Holocaust Studies, including:

-Nazi policies against the Jews and other racial and genocidal programs
-Jewish responses to Nazism (in and outside of Europe)
-Racism
-Nazi propaganda
-Ghettos and camps
-European collaboration
-War crimes trials
-Survivor testimony
-Commemoration and Museology
-World War II and its aftermath
-Holocaust literature, drama, film, art, etc.

The prize of $ 1000 (U.S. dollars) will be awarded to the best article as selected by a panel of judges. The competition is open to graduate students as well as established scholars.

We welcome submissions of 7,000-10,000 words (including footnotes) written in English and formatted according to the Chicago Manual of Style.

Manuscripts should be sent to the editorial office at
dapim_h@univ.haifa.ac.il,
Joseph.Pettican@tandf.co.uk,
or Henrietta.Thomson@tandf.co.uk

To be considered for the prize all submissions should be received by the end of December 2017.

All approaches and methodologies are welcome.

 

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Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust

New issue of Dapim | Studies on the Holocaust

New issue of Dapim – Studies on the Holocaust, 30-3, December 2016

Special issue:  Holocaust Commemoration: New Trends in Museums and Memorials

Editors: Michal Aharony and Gavriel D. Rosenfeld
Guest editor: James E. Young

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We are excited to share our most recent issue with you, a special issue on “New Trends in Museums and Memorials.” The essays explore the theme of Holocaust commemoration from an interdisciplinary perspective, presenting the insights of historians, sociologists, literary critics, and museum curators. Their articles examine a wide range of Holocaust museums and memorials across the globe: in Germany, Austria, Poland, Lithuania, Israel, United States, and Australia. They address a series of significant questions involving the ethics, aesthetics, and politics of representing the Holocaust: To what extent should Holocaust museums and memorials encompass other genocides and mass atrocities? How have artistic and architectural priorities shaped the designs of Holocaust museums and memorials? How do competing political interests and viewpoints shape Holocaust commemoration in different countries?

The volume includes the following nine articles: “Holocaust and Heroism in the Process of Establishing Yad Vashem (1942–1970)” by Doron Bar; “Is Eastern European ‘Double Genocide’ Revisionism Reaching Museums?” by Dovid Katz; “From the Periphery to the Center of Memory: Holocaust Memorials in Vienna” by Heidemarie Uhl; “Transmitting the Survivor’s Voice: Redeveloping the Sydney Jewish Museum” by Avril Alba; “Mixed Metaphors in Muranów: Architectural Metaphors and Meaning at the POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw,” by Gavriel D. Rosenfeld; “Yad Layeled at the Ghetto Fighters’ House: A Museum about Children in the Holocaust or a Museum for Children about the Holocaust?” by Nadav Heidecker; “Genocide and Relevance: Current Trends in United States Holocaust Museums” by Leah Sievers; “Subjects of Memory? On Performing Holocaust Memory in Two German Historical Museums” by Irit Dekel; “The Poetics of Memory: Aesthetics and Experience of Holocaust Remembrance in Museums” by Jennifer Hansen-Glucklich.

The issue’s nine essays explore a variety of common issues dealing with Holocaust representation in the contemporary urban environment. Readers of the essays—like visitors to the memorials and museums that are discussed in them—will no doubt come away with different insights and draw different conclusions about the changing ways in which the Holocaust is being commemorated around the world.  What these essays uniformly confirm, however, is that Holocaust commemoration continues to be a subject of intense scholarly interest.

Find this issue online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rdap20/current

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Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust, Special Projects

Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust, Volume 29, Issue 3 Special Issue: The Final Stage of the Holocaust

 

1584The complexity of the Holocaust in its full magnitude, reaches into countless subjects, disciplines, and professions. In order to begin to fully deconstruct, analyze, and understand the Holocaust, interdisciplinary research that transcends all boundaries must occur. The Strochlitz Institute for Holocaust Research at the University of Haifa is proud to announce the publication of our newest addition to Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust, our interdisciplinary, peer reviewed academic journal.

Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust publishes three editions each year, featuring academic articles written by scholars from all parts of the world. The articles are focused on all subjects and disciplines that relate to Holocaust Studies, World War II, and Anti-Semitism and together begin to create a more developed and wholesome picture of important aspects of Holocaust research. Available in English and in Hebrew, Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust caters to a wide audience of scholars, students, and those who take interest in learning and reading about various aspects of the Holocaust and its aftermath.

Through the involvement with Strochlitz Institute for Holocaust Research, and the publication of Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust, the Weiss-Livnat International MA Program in Holocaust Studies has developed a strong network of Holocaust scholars based in all parts of the world, working on many various types of disciplinary and interdisciplinary research. We are proud to share this research and network with our students, who have a great platform to learn from as they enter the world as budding Holocaust scholars, and the future of Holocaust research.

The newest addition, Volume 29, Issue 3 is a special issue on the Final Stage of the Holocaust. Although the events from the last months of WWII played a crucial part in the Holocaust and how it has been remembered, only recently have scholars begun to give attention to this period. On the occasion of the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II, this special issue presents a first collection of articles, based on current and up-to-date research projects, on different aspects of what can be termed the “final stage” of the Holocaust.

The special issue includes the following articles:

  • Evacuating the Camps: The Last Collective Crime of Nazi Society,” by Martin Clemens Winter.
  • The Politics of Human Remains at the ‘Peripheries of the Holocaust,” by Zuzanna Dziuban.
  • “The Fortune of Survival – Intermarried German Jews in the Dying Breath of the ‘Thousand-Year Reich,” by Maximilian Strnad.
  • “Survival of a Peculiar Remnant: The Jewish Population of Vienna During the Last Years of the War,” by Michaela Raggam-Blesch.
  • “Everyday Life and Survival at Mauthausen during the Final Stages of War: The Hungarian Jews,” by Regina Fritz.
  • “Edges of History and Memory: The ‘Final Stage’ of the Holocaust,” by Kobi Kabalek.

Please take a look at the newest issue of Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust at the link below: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rdap20/current

Interested in applying for our MA in Holocaust Studies Program?  You can find the application and more information at our website: http://holocaust-studies.haifa.ac.il/

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Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust

Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust, Volume 29 Issue 2

Why is the Holocaust one of the most widely researched topics? On a personal level, the event and its aftermath affected countless lives, and its impact has penetrated through the generations of those connected to it and those who find a connection to the story of the Holocaust. On a professional level, the complexity of the Holocaust in its full magnitude, reaches into countless subjects, disciplines, and professions. In order to begin to fully deconstruct, analyze, and understand the Holocaust, interdisciplinary research that transcends all boundaries must occur. The Strochlitz Institute for Holocaust Research at the University of Haifa is proud to announce the publication of our newest addition to Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust, our interdisciplinary, peer reviewed academic journal.

Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust publishes three additions each year, featuring academic articles written by scholars from all parts of the world. The articles are focused on all subjects and disciplines that relate to Holocaust Studies, World War II, and Anti-Semitism and together begin to create a more developed and wholesome picture of important aspects of Holocaust research. Available in English and in Hebrew, Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust caters to a wide audience of scholars, students, and those who take interest in learning and reading about various aspects of the Holocaust and its aftermath.

Through the involvement with Strochlitz Institute for Holocaust Research, and the publication of Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust, the Weiss-Livnat International MA Program in Holocaust Studies has developed a strong network of Holocaust scholars based in all parts of the world, working on many various types of disciplinary and interdisciplinary research. We are proud to share this research and network with our students, who have a great platform to learn from as they enter the world as budding Holocaust scholars, and the future of Holocaust research.

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The newest addition, Volume 29, Issue 2 features three articles:

“Personal Action as Collectivist Reconciliation: Children of ‘Aryan’ Citizens of Nazi Germany Living in Israel” by Eli Somer and Yael Agam

“Portugal, Jewish Refugees, and the Holocaust” by Irene Flunser Pimentel and Cláudia Ninhos

“Nationalities, Histories, Rhetorics: Real/Reel Representations of the Holocaust and Holocaust Trials and a Poethics of Film and Law” by Caroline Joan S. Picart

Please take a look at the newest addition of Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust at the link below:

http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rdap20/current#.Vajhsc6gfFI

Interested in applying for our MA in Holocaust Studies Program?  You can find the application and more information at our website: http://holocaust-studies.haifa.ac.il/

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Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust

Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust – Issue 29-1

IMG_6149Dapim – Studies on the Shoah, is the inter-disciplinary academic journal of the  Strochlitz Institute for Holocaust Research.  We are privileged to be part of the same institute as this peer-reviewed bi-lingual academic journal.  Dapim is devoted to the inter-disciplinary study of the Holocaust, the Second World War and anti-Semitism.  Scholars from around the world contribute to this journal, and here in our MA program we benefit from learning from many of the featured authors.

This month “Dapim” 29-1 was published.  The issue features four articles from Australian, German, Italian and Israeli scholars:

Playing for Their Lives: Music, Musicians and Trauma in Holocaust Film

By Deb Waterhouse-Watson & Adam Brown
Ordinary Clerks or Trailblazers of Destruction? – The ‘First Wave’ of Chiefs of Civil Administration and Their Implementation of Nazi Policy During the German Invasion of Poland in 1939

By Jochen Böhler
Truth and Memory After Catastrophe: Historical Fact and the Historical Witness

By Frida Bertolini
Labor and Extermination: The Labor Camp at the Dęblin-Irena Airfield Puławy County, Lublin Province, Poland – 1942–1944

By Talia Farkash

We are very excited to have contributed with such outstanding scholars, and are excited to share this issue with you today.

To read the entire forum, and subscribe to “Dapim – Studies on the Holocaust,” you can click here.

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Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust

Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust – “Engaging Survivors: Assessing ‘Testimony’ and ‘Trauma’ as Foundational Concepts”

CoverDapim – Studies on the Shoah, is the inter-disciplinary academic journal of the  Strochlitz Institute for Holocaust Research.  We are privileged to be part of the same institute as this peer-reviewed bi-lingual academic journal.  Dapim is devoted to the inter-disciplinary study of the Holocaust, the Second World War and anti-Semitism.  Scholars from around the world contribute to this journal, and here in our MA program we benefit from learning from many of the featured authors.

This month “Dapim” 28-3 was published.  The issue features three articles and an exceptional research forum, which featured guest editor Henry Greenspan.

The forum titled “Engaging Survivors: Assessing ‘Testimony’ and ‘Trauma’ as Foundational Concepts” encompassed diverse opinions from a wealth of scholars around the world.  Contributors included Sara Horowitz, Éva Kovács, Berel Lang, Dori Laub, Kenneth Waltzer and Annette Wieviorka, as well as guest editor Henry Greenspan.

In the forum’s introduction, Greenspan writes:

“What is most striking about the contributions to follow is their sheer diversity. Clearly, much of that reflects the range of disciplines, intellectual styles, and professional careers represented. But it also tells us that there is very little approaching consensus about the meaning, utility, and reach of testimony and trauma, not only in the context of Holocaust and genocide studies, but more widely. We believe that this is itself an important finding about two of our most foundational concepts. Diversity of perspectives is, in general, a good thing; there is no inherent virtue in consensus. But we should at least know where things stand. At present, scholars who invoke testimony and trauma are not simply pursuing very different trails. They are working in very different forests. ”

We are very excited to have contributed with such outstanding scholars, and are excited to share the forum with you today.

To read the entire forum, and subscribe to “Dapim – Studies on the Holocaust,” you can click here.

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Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust

Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust – 2013 Article Prize Competition Winner

photo 1“Dapim – Studies on the Shoah,” is the inter-disciplinary academic journal of the  Strochlitz Institute for Holocaust Research.  We are privileged to be part of the same institute as this peer-reviewed bi-lingual academic journal.  Dapim is devoted to the inter-disciplinary study of the Holocaust, the Second World War and anti-Semitism.  Scholars from around the world contribute to this journal, and here in our MA program we benefit from learning from many of the featured authors.

“Dapim” holds an annual article prize competition to call attention to the best submission of the year. The Editorial Board of “Dapim” recently released the following statement in regard to the 2013 Article Prize Competition:

“We are pleased to announce that Sarah Gensburger has been selected the winner of our 2013 Article Prize Competition.  In her article, “Witnessing the Looting of Jewish Belongings During the Holocaust: What Can History Do with Images?”SGensburger Photo her multilayered approach and unique research made her article stand out among our other entries.  We look forward to seeing the ways in which her article will influence future research, and are proud to have published it in our most recent issue.”

The article will be maid free on the Taylor & Francis website for a short time following her success.  You may find it here!

The abstract reads: “Since 2000, there has been a great increase in studies on the spoliation of Jews in France. This research has established the chronology and topography of antisemitic spoliation, identified its actors and assessed its scale. In doing so, it has led to the formulation of new questions. Previous research sought a precise understanding of the linkage between the quest for economic gain and the implementation of racial extermination at the very core of the looting process. New research, which varies greatly in its scale and scope, draws on an ever-wider range of sources, some of which were never previously studied, and employs many innovative methodological approaches. However, so far, it has paid no attention to archival images, which have been used merely for the purposes of illustration. Yet such photographs constitute documents that can help us to understand precisely how the actors involved in this looting actually viewed their work. This article examines an album of 85 photographs of the looting of Jews in Paris that has been preserved in the federal archives of Koblenz under the shelf mark B 323-311.”

To submit an article for Dapim’s 2014 Article Prize Competition please contact dapim_h@univ.haifa.ac.il

 

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